Whole Foods is a chain of natural and organic grocery stores based out of Austin, Texas. They currently operate over 300 stores nationwide.  Pricing and sales may vary by store.  Whole Foods has an in-store coupon booklet, printable store coupons on their website, and most locations also accept manufacturer coupons.  Coupon policies vary by store; call before shopping to determine if your local store allows stacking.  The best way to save at Whole Foods is to shop their sale prices and stack  them when allowed with store and manufacturer coupons!

Read and become familiar with the Whole Foods Coupon Policy.

Part 1: Coupons accepted by Whole Foods

Manufacturer-issued coupons: These coupons are found in the freestanding inserts in your Sunday paper: Smart Source, Red Plum, and Procter & Gamble. They can also be found in magazines. Whole Foods will not give overage for coupons valued higher than the item’s price.

Printable Coupons:  Whole Foods accepts valid printable coupons with a scannable bar code.

Whole Foods Store Coupons: These are found in the email newsletters, the Whole Deal brochure and printable coupons found at WholeFoodsMarket.com. Select Whole Foods store locations allow stacking a store coupon with a manufacturer coupon for additional savings. (Call your local store to confirm.)

Part 2: What makes Whole Foods KRAZY!

Stacking: Stack a store promotion sale with a manufacturer coupon (and store coupon if you can!) to get great deals on natural and organic food. Many locations also offer a $0.05- $0.10 discount per reusable bag used. 

Markdowns: Browse your store for markdowns and clearance items. Stack these with an applicable manufacturer coupon for the best deals.

Bulk section: Check out your Whole Foods bulk section for low prices on conventional and organic ingredients from grains, rice, beans, nuts, and dried fruit to herbs, spices, coffee, tea, and nut butters.

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