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Extreme Couponing Tip: Know Your Price Points

Knowing when to buy and when to pass on a sale is an important part of being a Krazy Couponer. Make sure you set personal price points and stock up when sales match up.

A price point is the highest price you are willing to pay for a certain product. Price points will differ by region and your needs. For example, your price point for a loaf of bread may be higher for gluten-free options, a favorite brand of laundry detergent, or organic items. Other factors will be areas that double coupons, cost of living, limited supply or high demand.

Check out the KCL Stock Up Price List that shows 3-month stock up prices (very good) or 6-month (amazing!) prices to serve as a guideline for your personal price points. In general, price points will be a bit higher than stock up prices, but it will give you a good idea of what to look for.

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15 thoughts on “Extreme Couponing Tip: Know Your Price Points”

  1. mjweaver says:

    Is there a template of this kind of spreadsheet somewhere online?

  2. maple.beene says:

    When I saw this tip I was so excited! I just started couponing and could really use help with deals. But after I opened the chart, I am even more confused. Ive been looking at the adds over and over. Im so confused on how you actually get items for these prices?? Can anyone help?

    • The Krazy Coupon Lady says:

      These prices come from tracking a year’s worth of deals highlighted on KCL. They include deals from all sorts of stores– drugstores, supercenters, grocery stores, and office supply stores.
      They are after coupons and include prices after rebates, rewards, and/or Catalinas. It serves as a guideline– it basically lets you know you shouldn’t buy toothpaste unless it’s less than $1, so sometimes the icon means “It’s okay to buy it at this price [99¢] if you need it/ this is your preferred brand/ you have a limited store selection” but reference the full stock up price list for the *best* prices to buy at.
      The prices are for the West Coast with non-doubling prices (so prices will probably be higher in Alaska, Hawaii, D.C., or New York City– places with high cost of living, but cheaper in areas that have a lower cost of living and stores that double or triple coupons).

  3. Kim Bradley says:

    I believe the 3-month and 6-month stock up prices means that if you find it for the 3-month price you should by enough to last you for 3 months and like wise. Someone please correct me if I am wrong because I and not positive I have it correct.

  4. couponlee1 says:

    Does the 6 month and 3 month price mean every 3 or 6 months this should be the price point? Does it mean if you shop every 3 or 6 months for that particular item this should be the price? I’m confused

    • Guest says:

      It means that those prices tend to come around every 3 months or 6 months, so you’ll want to stock up for 1-3 months or 4-6 months+, respectively when those prices come up. The stock up prices are based on sale cycles and seasons. For example, cream soups, baking supplies, and canned pumpkin will be the cheapest around the holidays, while summer is best for a lot of produce.

    • The Krazy Coupon Lady says:

      It means that when a price is a “3-month” stock up price, it usually comes around every 3 months or so, so you’ll want to stock up with about 3 months’ worth of product. Same goes for the 6-month price– you’ll want to get 6 months+ (especially of non-perishables), or the maximum limit allowed, as some of the stellar deals have small limit numbers.

  5. cldemaria says:

    I’m new to this, please explain the price point list and how you came up with those prices. I don’t understand the difference between the 6month and 3month price point differences. How do you come up with the prices?

    • The Krazy Coupon Lady says:

      These prices on the master list are the best prices that we tracked for a year. They are based on our non-doubling area (the west coast), and after coupons/ Rewards/ Catalinas/ rebates. The three month prices are good prices to buy at– you’ll want to buy a 1-3 month supply of it at that price if you’re in need of it. If you come across a six month price, you’ll definitely want to stock up since those prices only come around a few times a year. They are from all kinds of locations– drugstores, grocery stores, farmer’s markets, supercenters, etc.
      Keep in mind your area’s prices may differ or your stock up prices might be different based on brand and diet preferences (Tide vs. Xtra or Purex detergent, organic/ all-natural options, etc) or store selection in your area (if you don’t have a drugstore, prices for personal care items will probably be higher).

    • The Krazy Coupon Lady says:

      The master stock up price list was tracked on a year’s worth of deals we covered at KCL, based out of the non-doubling West Coast (where we’re located). It includes prices from drugstores, grocery stores, supercenters, office supply and other locations such as farmer’s markets or online shopping. They are also based on the yearly sale cycles, such as canned soup, cranberry sauce, and baking supplies around the holidays, condiments and fresh produce in the summer, school supplies in the fall, etc.
      The “3-month” stock up prices usually come around every 3 months or so, so you’ll want to stock up with about 3 months’ worth of product. Same goes for the 6-month price– you’ll want to get 6 months+ (especially of non-perishables), or the maximum limit allowed, as some of the stellar deals have small limit numbers.

  6. AlmostRetired says:

    A personal price point can also depend on how much time one has to spend on couponing. Since I work full time and can’t spend as much time as many on my coupons, I find that I have to decide where my couponing time is best spent each week. I can’t do as much research, clipping, organizing and shopping as I’d like to do. Therefore my price point might be higher on some items but then other times I manage to beat the 6 month stock up prices. I know that I’m doing so much better than I did before couponing and that’s what counts, not always that I get the best deal out there. I do keep a google doc spreadsheet of all of my expenditures to be sure I stay within my self imposed monthly budget. I track it by store, and also by category (food, toiletries, liquor, household) so that at the end of the month I have a quick review of what I spent in each category and where I shopped. I also list the UPs, RR, Catalina’s etc by expiration date because I have been known to forget about one or two and that is a killer! This way I can see everything at a glance and I can access my google doc from home or work.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Keep in mind, though, that the stock-up prices on the stock-up price list are generally lower than the prices for items in the blog entries using the 3-month & 6-month stock up price logos. The blog will indicate that an item is at a 3-month or 6-month stock-up price relative to the original price, not necessarily agreeing with the the stock-up price from the list.
    My price point for groceries in my area is if the price is lower than Wal-Mart (Wal-Mart is an hour from my home). I keep a handwritten list of current Wal-Mart prices so I know when I should buy/stock up from the the grocery stores closer to home (Safeway, Raley’s, etc.).
    My price point for health & beauty items & cleaning supplies (from CVS, Riteaid, etc.) is almost freeor under $0.50 for everything with the exception of Herbal Essence for my teenage daughter I will pay up to $0.99 a bottle =) – I NEVER buy any of these items from Wal-Mart anymore – ever.
    Thanks KCL SO MUCH for your website – you have allowed our family to save money and give so many things away to folks not as blessed as us – just this morning I am going to our local food pantry with bags full of things to share – how fun is that??? =)

    • The Krazy Coupon Lady says:

      Way to spread the coupon love, norcalKCL! That is wonderful to share your extras with those in need. We’re glad that our website has helped! :)
      It’s true that the icons on matchups can differ from the master list. There can be several reasons for this: It can be due to brand differences (some customers are willing to pay more to get Crest or Tide than the cheapest name brand), area differences (areas that double coupons, so their matchups might differ from areas that don’t double), or the specific store (areas that don’t have a drugstore that has super cheap personal care items might have a stock up price of 99¢ since they can only shop at one or two stores in a small town, etc).
      And here’s some helpful info for the newbies:
      Basically you shouldn’t buy toothpaste unless it’s less than $1, so sometimes the icon means “It’s okay to buy it at this price [99¢] if you need it/ this is your preferred brand/ you have a limited store selection” but reference the full stock up price list for the *best* prices to buy at.
      These prices are based on non-doubling prices (Heather & I don’t have any stores that regularly double coupons), though after store discounts and coupons. Remember that these are the best prices from year-round. So the cheap cranberry sauce, soups, and baking supplies will be around the holidays, diet products in January, the summer is best for lots of fresh produce, late summer/ early fall for school supplies, etc. And they vary by store– the best prices on personal care items are at drugstores, sometimes convenience or drugstores have great prices on milk & eggs to get you in their doors, a local farmer’s market or u-pick farm for produce, etc. To get the prices listed (or ones close to it), Krazy Couponers will need to shop several stores and shop the monthly & yearly sale cycles, plus utilize Rewards, promos, Catalinas, and rebates.

  8. Anonymous says:

    I am so, so glad you posted this!!! I’ve just started couponing and noticed that I can get wrapped up on “a good deal”. But then an even better deal comes along, but I already bought the product. I really appreciate it!!!!!!!!!