Every household has go-to products that are on the shopping list no matter what. Examples include bread, produce, toilet paper, dairy products and chicken. Others may be non-essentials your family can’t live without like peanut butter, disinfecting wipes or tortilla chips. When you know regular prices, sale prices, and rock bottom prices on these items, you can best choose where the hottest deals are and when to stock up.

Those just starting a journey as a Krazy Couponer might not have paid a lot of attention to prices in the past. That makes for uncertainty whether an item is a good deal. Fear not! Here at KCL, we do the work for you by letting you know great prices (indicated in our matchups with the icon at left)

 

or amazing prices (using the icon at left).

 

KCL recommends creating:

  • A two-week stockpile of perishables, such as dairy items, bread and produce
  • A one- to two-month supply of perishables that can be frozen, such as meat and cheese
  • A six-month’s-plus supply of non-perishables and shelf-stable items.

That means when a great deal comes up, stock up accordingly. If your family goes through two loaves of bread a week, and bread is at a super-low price, buy about four loaves. If toothbrushes are a stellar price, try to get enough to last your family six months or more.

When shopping the basics, look for the store that has the lowest prices on the most items. If one store has milk for $2.00 a gallon but high prices on meat and produce, you might opt for a store that has milk for $2.50 but great deals on other staples. Remember that prices are regional, so some areas will have a higher cost of living; purchase accordingly. Write down or memorize prices of your favorite items so you’ll know in the future what’s hot and what’s not. Also, check out past receipts to see what prices have been previously and what and where the lowest prices are.

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7 thoughts on “Extreme Couponing Tip: Know Prices of Frequently Purchased Items”

  1. courtingcouponing says:

    I LOVE those yellow icons you use. When I’m in a rush making my shopping list or am only looking to add to my stockpile, that’s all I look at, they are so useful.

  2. Katie Bardo says:

    Great article, so very true. One thing I do if I go to a new store is to check the prices on a couple of things I buy regularly to gauge if the store has their prices on the lower or higher end of the pricing spectrum.