Update: The coupon is no longer available.

Next week at Walgreens, Irritable Bowel Syndrome Therapy tablets will be free after a $7.00 Register Reward. Print a $1.00 coupon to turn this deal into a moneymaker!

 

Join The Krazy Coupon Lady on Facebook and be the first to know about hot deals! 

Leave a Reply

34 thoughts on “Gone: Moneymaker Irritable Bowel Therapy at Walgreens, Starting 10/20!”

  1. brandywalker says:

    coupon no longer there :(

  2. imdeb1963 says:

    the link to the above coupon gives a message that the page cannot be found on the product website, could the coupon be gone already?

  3. Tsunami Lan says:

    My Walgreens doesn’t give the overage. They zero (0) it out. NO its not a MM for me. But awesome deal. Thank you ;)

  4. Anonymous says:

    It’s bad enough that Pizzaz has to deal with irritable cashiers and irritable store managers…the last thing I need is an irritable bowel!!!

  5. Anonymous says:

    Well, it always ticks me off that “homeopathic” companies are allowed to sell people sugar water, but as long as I can guarantee that they’re losing money on it I’m in ^_^ (For the unititiated, homeopathy is the pseudoscience of taking poisons and diluting them to the point that there may not even be a single atom of the “active ingredient” in an entire container of “medicine”, on the basis that the water’s memory of the trace amounts of poison will somehow help your body fight the symptoms of that poisoning. It’s been disproved by every study ever done on it, but it was grandfathered in when the FDA was founded, so they’re allowed to make BS claims on their packaging and not get sued.)

    • Anonymous says:

      Sorry–have to disagree with that statement. I have used many homeopathics with great success as opposed to conventional medicine, which is usually a crapshoot. I am not a naturopath, but have been taking nothing but vitamins, minerals, and herbs since the 80′s and am constantly amazed at what plant based products can cure. I do not remember the last time I had even a cold, and at 59 years old am healthier than most 30 year olds who patronize doctors. Look at the long list of warnings on prescription meds and the ones that the legal profession is suing over, and every one was at one time approved by the FDA.

      • Anonymous says:

        I’ve been a user of science-based medicine my whole life, and can’t remember the last time I had even a cold, so I guess we cancel each other out ^_^ There are plenty of plant-based remedies that work, but homeopathy isn’t plant-based. It’s magic water based. To be plant-based, it would have to actually have plants in it.

        • Anonymous says:

          Rhus toxocodendra (sp?) = poison ivy. Found in a lot of homeopathics. That’s just one of many, that if I had a book to look them all up or knew Latin better, I could identify others.

          • Anonymous says:

            Bah, I had a whole reply written but it included a link so it got flagged for moderation. Hopefully it’ll show up soon, but in the mean time, here’s the short version: Poison Ivy is a plant, but that doesn’t mean that homeopathics that say they use it actually contain any. The standard dilution for Rhus Tox, for example, is 30C. That means making a 1% dilution of poison ivy, then making a 1% dilution of that, then making a 1% dilution of that, over and over 30 times. By the time you’re done, it’s easy to end up with a dose of homeopathic remedy that doesn’t actually include any Rhus Tox.

            • Anonymous says:

              Don’t you hate the moderation cop? He’s probably OD’d on prescription meds–lol. I totally know and understand the concept of homeopathics and how they are created. It may seem like it is non-existent or non-functional after the dilutions, but if it works, who cares? And it does work, without harmful side effects, something that prescriptions meds can’t claim. My doctor friend (before his untimely death in a wreck) used to call to ask what to use to treat certain conditions that his prescriptions failed at. He said “they just don’t teach us that kind of stuff in med school”. Other docs I have known have said the same thing, that they don’t know enough about natural treatments, and they wish it was taught. At least if you wish to take chemical meds, take a good quality of milk thistle to protect your liver from the damage they cause.

            • Anonymous says:

              The placebo effect is a wonderful thing. And study after study has shown the effect of homeopathic remedies to be *exactly the same* as the effect of a placebo. If I have a mild headache, my strong belief in the power of the placebo effect will let me cure it with a Tic-Tac, but that doesn’t mean that Tic-Tacs are an effective treatment for headaches. And it definitely doesn’t mean that the Ferrero Company should be able to charge $10 a pack on the basis of their curative powers. And if you’re worried about the toxicity of chemicals, you should really look into dihydrogren monoxide. It’s a chemical that’s been found in every tumor ever studied, it can be lethal when inhaled, and it plays an integral role in the preparation of all homeopathic remedies.

            • Anonymous says:

              Looks like a draw–you will never convince me to take the FDA approved chemicals and I will never convince you to use the non-harmful homeopathics.

            • americangirljn says:

              Thank you at least someone stopped this! There are always to sides to every thing and always strong opinions on both sides!! I do wonder if this product work thou! I have never tried it and I do wonder the active ingredients?! I am still considering getting this or not! After reading these comments I am more confused then ever!!!!

            • Anonymous says:

              You can always return it if you don’t like it. I missed my calling for being a lawyer–my mom always said I would argue even if I knew I was wrong! But when it comes to health related conversations, I am adamant about using as much natural God-created things as possible. My husband’s doctor (at the VA) used to complain about my giving him vitamins and herbs, but he is in much better health now than 15 years ago, even with agent orange complications.

            • Sheralyn says:

              Do you mean, “Dihydrogen monoxide,” as in water? 2 parts hydrogen, 1 part oxygen, also goes by the moniker H2O.

            • Anonymous says:

              Yup, it’s a technique for showing how misleading the “it has a scary chemical name, so it must be bad” rhetoric can be. I’ve actually gotten acquaintances to sign a petition urging a ban on dihydrogen monoxide before they caught on. If you google it you can find some really funny parody websites.

            • Sheralyn says:

              LOL @ “He’s probably OD’d on prescription meds.”

  6. Jessica Blount says:

    it’s too bad it is register rewards and not balance points…you could come out ahead by $10 by buying 6 of them and reaching the 40,000 point mark to use for $50….

    • americangirljn says:

      well there is probably a limit on this sense it is giving out rewards! But I also would like this to be points rather then a RR because A RR has an expiration date and a RR has to be used in full! with points you can choose how much of it you want to use at a time! I have learned to like points better!

  7. dyron. says:

    thanks for the heads up KCL! :)

  8. bri says:

    im still debating whether or not to get the freebie floss from wags… i hate their coupon 1 – 1 policy and hate having to get useless filler items =(. I LOVE RITE AID! LOVE THEIR print out UPS and their load-2-card coupon! facebook coupons & VV coupons!!!

  9. emkat13 says:

    oh boy! ;-)…silence is golden…wish some of the higher MMs were on products I use.

  10. wfteresa says:

    Thanks KCL—love MM’s! Now, if there was just a way to not have to pay tax on everything I would be a happy camper! LOL