A year ago, my husband was prescribed an expensive drug for his asthma. With three prescriptions filled monthly for our family, we were really stretching our budget. With a little online research, I found several ways to get prescription drugs for free.

Free Antibiotics, Vitamins, and Diabetes and Blood Pressure Medications at Your Local Pharmacy

Pharmacies all over the country offer select antibiotics and diabetes and blood pressure medication for free. Find your nearby pharmacy below to see how much money your family can save this year on medication and vitamins. If your favorite pharmacy isn’t listed, make sure to call them to ask if they have any free or discounted prescription programs.

  • Publix: select antibiotics and medication for blood pressure and diabetes.
  • Wegmans: select antibiotics.
  • ShopRite: select antibiotics and medication for diabetes.
  • Meijer: select antibiotics, diabetes medication and prenatal vitamins.
  • PriceChopper: select antibiotics and medication for diabetes, along with diabetes supplies.
  • United Supermarkets: a large list of antibiotics and select prenatal vitamins.
  • Giant Eagle: select antibiotics and medication for diabetes.
  • Reasors: select antibiotics, prenatal vitamins and children’s multivitamins.
  • Schnucks: select antibiotics and prenatal vitamins.
  • Giant Food Stores: select antibiotics.
  • Big Y: select antibiotics.
  • Super 1 Foods: select antibiotics.
  • Harris Teeter: select antibiotics.
  • Stater Bros: select antibiotics and medications for diabetes.
  • Martins Foods: select antibiotics.

Samples

Doctor offices often have medication samples on hand that they will give you if you ask. I needed a prescription facial cream for short-term use and was able to get it from my dermatologist at no cost.

Co-Pay Cards, Savings Cards and Coupons

We were able to get my husband’s asthma medication for free using a co-pay card, saving us $100 per month! All it took was a conversation with his doctor to find out if the pharmaceutical company offered a co-pay program.  We used it each month to fill his prescription. Not only was it free, it was hassle-free.

Co-pay cards are offered by pharmaceutical companies to offset the cost of prescription medications. They pay the entire cost of the medication, a portion of the cost, or your health insurance co-pay. They are available even to families with health insurance. Most co-pay cards are available through doctors, but some pharmaceutical companies allow you to print a co-pay coupon online  such as for Singulair or Intuniv or join a Savings Card program such for Lunesta. If you don’t find a program by searching online, call your doctor or the pharmaceutical company directly to inquire about co-pay and savings programs.

Prescription Assistance Programs

If you don’t have prescription drug coverage, 475 prescription assistance programs all over the U.S. offer over 2500 prescription medications for free. At the Partnership for Prescription Assistance, you can enter the prescriptions that your family requires, along with some personal information and you will get a list of programs that you can contact for assistance. For the medications my family requires, there were three local programs that were recommended to us. There are programs available to families with and without health insurance.

Some pharmaceutical companies offer their own prescription assistance program. Shire offers a prescription assistance program for their 6 prescription medications including Carbatrol, Fosrenol, Intuniv, Lialda, Pentasa and Vyvanse. I happen to take Pentasa for years before ever hearing about the program. Forest Pharmaceuticals, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis and Pfizer also have prescription assistance programs.

My best advice is to try every route you can until you can get your medication costs as reduced as possible. If your doctor doesn’t have samples, ask about co-pay cards. If that isn’t an option, search online or contact the pharmaceutical company directly to discuss savings programs and coupons. You may even be able to use these in conjunction with a prescription assistance program. We’ve saved $130 per month with just a little effort!

This has been a guest post by Tiffany from Tigard, OR
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3 thoughts on “How to Reduce the Cost of Prescriptions”

  1. Anonymous says:

    If you get prescription allergy medicine, look at this article. I did it myself and saved almost as much as they did in the article!http://voices.yahoo.com/how-saved-more-than-82-prescription-no-coupons-11285602.html

  2. Miranda Cortez says:

    I’m a Pharmacy Technician, and do a lot of billing in our pharmacy. If you plan on using co-pay cards, RX coupons, or discount programs pleeeaase present them to the technician when you drop off your script, or ** well before** you pick up your script. All billing is done prior to pickup, and having to re-bill at pickup is time consuming, and does not always work. Many times I have to completely redo prescriptions due to copay card/discount program fill limits. Presenting all alternative forms of payment prior to pickup will also keep you from becoming frustrated at the counter because you have to wait longer for your meds.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Check out Walgreens Prescription Savings Club. It cost $35 a year, But that cover everyone in my home including pets. If you don’t save more than the membership cost on prescriptions for the year they they will pay you the differents. Also when you slide your card you get 10% back on every Walgreen, W Brand, Nice, and Studio 35 beauty product you buy. I have saved so much in the 6 months I’ve had my card.