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Yard Sale Success Strategies

Wealthy neighborhoods are notorious for having some of the best yard sales around town. There’s a reason for that. Yard sales are not a waste of time. You can make money if you know what you’re doing.  There are proven techniques the pros use that can net you hundreds of dollars. A few yard sales each spring and summer might be what you need to help reduce debt or pay rent.

Sell Big Ticket Items

Building a successful yard sale begins with the big ticket items. These are the items that will sell for more than $100. These are also the toughest items to part with sometimes. One or more of these items in your yard sale can generate enough cash to make your yard sale worthwhile. Some examples include:

  • Used car
  • Antiques
  • Dining room set
  • Computer
  • Refrigerator
  • Washer/dryer combo

You may not get the highest price you want, but you can sell big ticket items for a substantial amount. The first trick is to not mark those items at the sale. You’ll also have more wiggle room to negotiate prices. Research what the item sells for on Craigslist.com. Savvy yard sale buyers will have done their research too, and they know what they can get for similar items. If you’re having a two-day yard sale, they’ll research Craigslist first and return the following day. If you list too high, they won’t be interested. A good starting point is a 40% markdown of the item purchased new. If it’s in stellar condition, then you could price it for much more.

Change Neighborhoods if You Have To

The neighborhood where you’re selling can make a difference on the outcome of your yard sales. You’re going to attract larger crowds if you’re in a good location and if buyers perceive that they can land great deals. Whether it’s fair or not, avid yard sale shoppers know to scout middle class or higher income neighborhoods. If you don’t live in one, or if you live in rural area that’s out of reach, then you’re going to have to change neighborhoods. Here are some ideas:

  • Use a church, business or other organization’s parking lot in the neighborhood
  • Ask a friend to use their lawn for one day or more
  • Join a multi-family yard sale in the same neighborhood
  • Sell at community yard sales in the neighborhood

It can be a pain in the neck to transport your items back and forth, especially if you have big ticket items. But the chance of selling your items, and for better prices, is greater if you take this approach. You might also arrange for a charitable organization to pick up remaining items near the close of the yard sale so as not to have to haul back unwanted, unsold goods.

Don’t Clutter the Sale

The last thing you want is for your yard sale to get labeled as a junk sale from buyers glancing at it from afar or doing a quick check at the sale. If you fill it with old clothing, broken toys, equipment that doesn’t work or other distractions, you may lose buyers who don’t have the time or patience to wade through your items. Pretend you’re the owner of a retail outlet and display your things in an organized and attractive way. It may not stay organized for long as buyers rummage through your items, but you can touch it up as the sale progresses. Take advantage of the lawn space and area in the driveway. Spread things out as much as possible for people to move around, while still being able to keep an eye on your items.

Be Wiling to Let Go

Don’t waste your time haggling over 25 cents — you’ll lose focus on the bigger selling items. Don’t waste time with buyers who want to spend $1 at the sale versus buyers who can spend $50 or more. The willingness to let go of items with low value is a proven yard sale success strategy. If you don’t, at the end of the day you might find yourself  stuck with items that will only clutter your home.

Yard sales can be fun and successful. It’s a chance for you to get rid of your items, earn extra cash and meet new people. Stay positive, and enlist the help of your family. Get your kids to sell books, toys and other items so that they learn how to plan and host yard sales.

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57 thoughts on “Yard Sale Success Strategies”

  1. Angelakjennings says:

    My mom and I have a garage sale usually every summer. We actually have clientele that we call ahead of time to come to the sale. The list to call gets longer every year. We typically make over $2000 every year without very many big items. I work retail and know how to merchandise and sell. I always talk to the people there and show them different items that they may not have seen. We never take the left over back into the house. We call someone to come get it and use it as a tax deduction. Good luck to everyone. Make some money!

  2. Angelakjennings says:

    My mom and I have a garage sale usually every summer. We actually have clientele that we call ahead of time to come to the sale. The list to call gets longer every year. We typically make over $2000 every year without very many big items. I work retail and know how to merchandise and sell. I always talk to the people there and show them different items that they may not have seen. We never take the left over back into the house. We call someone to come get it and use it as a tax deduction. Good luck to everyone. Make some money!

  3. Nellie Rich says:

    Yard sales are not a waste of time. You can make money if you know what you’re doing. There are proven techniques the pros use that can net you hundreds of dollars. A few yard sales ea

  4. I read a book called Miserly moms that has a chapter on yard sales. She recommends marking things down by 40-50% on large ticket items and by 90% on smaller ticket items like clothing. That is what I usually go by when shopping yard sales or pricing my own. Thanks for all the tips though! A lot of the other comments have great ideas too. We just moved and need to down size a bit. I see a yard sale coming up very soon.

  5. Myowncrew says:

    I always make out well in my garage sale. It takes me about 2 wks to prep. I have everything to coorspond with items and tag everything. I label all the clothes with string tags and they all get put on hangers on clothes racks. Basically, I set everything up like a store and play soft music. My kids sell ice cold drinks too. People always compliment me on how organized it is. I do have a few things that I lay out on the ground, but mostly everything is on tables. The thing I hate most when I go to garage sales is bending over to look in a box…one it kills my back, and I think of others if they have to do that same thing.

  6. Myowncrew says:

    I always make out well in my garage sale. It takes me about 2 wks to prep. I have everything to coorspond with items and tag everything. I label all the clothes with string tags and they all get put on hangers on clothes racks. Basically, I set everything up like a store and play soft music. My kids sell ice cold drinks too. People always compliment me on how organized it is. I do have a few things that I lay out on the ground, but mostly everything is on tables. The thing I hate most when I go to garage sales is bending over to look in a box…one it kills my back, and I think of others if they have to do that same thing.

  7. Myowncrew says:

    I always make out well in my garage sale. It takes me about 2 wks to prep. I have everything to coorspond with items and tag everything. I label all the clothes with string tags and they all get put on hangers on clothes racks. Basically, I set everything up like a store and play soft music. My kids sell ice cold drinks too. People always compliment me on how organized it is. I do have a few things that I lay out on the ground, but mostly everything is on tables. The thing I hate most when I go to garage sales is bending over to look in a box…one it kills my back, and I think of others if they have to do that same thing.

  8. Dezzy says:

    i wish i could have a yard sale :/ i live in an apartment complex

    • YS Queen of Central Florida says:

      Apartment complexes down here have yard sales all the time. Go ask the office if you can have one, as long as they say yes, then ask them if you can post a sign about it to get others to have one the same day. Post it at the exit and have it say something like “community yard sale xx/xx/xx” Also, print out a flyer and post it by the mail boxes. See if the complex will let you mark off a part of the parking lot for that morning and have everyone set up in the same area. If you can get at least 10 people to participate, then you can definitely call it a community sale! Make sure you give them at least 2 full weeks notice, 3 is even better so they can get prepared. Then buy a big neon poster board, and put a sign out in front of the complex starting Sunday before the sale. Post it on Craigslist and any other free local boards. You can use the same sign for the residents and the traffic, just move it that Sunday, but make it big and legible. This is a win win situation for the complex. It will put less trash in their dumpsters, put extra money in their tenants hands, and bring a flow of traffic to their complex.

  9. Beth says:

    We used to have yard sales at my sister-in-law’s house because she lives on a busy street. We would buy lot of clothes at JCPenney’s that were marked down to their 80% off prices, then double our cost on our price tag, but leave the original JCP tag on so people could see how much they were saving off the original price. That was so much fun and we made lots of money.

  10. Beth says:

    We used to have yard sales at my sister-in-law’s house because she lives on a busy street. We would buy lot of clothes at JCPenney’s that were marked down to their 80% off prices, then double our cost on our price tag, but leave the original JCP tag on so people could see how much they were saving off the original price. That was so much fun and we made lots of money.

  11. Beth says:

    We used to have yard sales at my sister-in-law’s house because she lives on a busy street. We would buy lot of clothes at JCPenney’s that were marked down to their 80% off prices, then double our cost on our price tag, but leave the original JCP tag on so people could see how much they were saving off the original price. That was so much fun and we made lots of money.

  12. Heartsstorm2002 says:

    I like YS Queen do this for a living. I buy and resell and so do a huge number of others in this area. none of us will pay the 4.00 for a 10.00 item. on the other hand I buy truckloads every week so if yo are willing to work with me on the price i buy more. I do not go back to yard sales the next day or at the end of the day as I live out further. I would have to say my pet peeve is signs also. make them readable and PLEASE take them down or at least put a date on them so we do not wonder well is that another sale to go to or was that a month ago or last week. as for pricing i do not price anything at a yard sale because if you are willing to work on pricing and someone thinks you are too high alot of the time here they just wont ask.

  13. katy says:

    This post is quite timely – the World’s Longest Yard Sale (the Hwy 127 Yard Sale) is this coming weekend, Aug 4th-7th. Extends from Alabama to Michigan. Check it out if you live anywhere near the 127!

  14. YS Queen of Central Florida says:

    I am a yard sale queen, so I know there is some good advice in here. I am a re-seller and I go to hundreds and hundreds of yard sales every year and hold at least 2-6 per year myself. Start with Signs, make sure they are visible from at least 100-150 yards. Make sure that you have a sign at every single turn. If they can’t find it after a few seconds, they won’t come. With gas at $3.50-4.00 a gallon, no one wants to waste time looking for a sale. If you live off of a road where the speed limit is over 45 miles per hour, place signs at several hundred yards before the turn and then at the turn so they can slow down and get in the correct lane to make the turn instead of having to go turn around.

    Place big ticket items up front so they can be easily seen. I do disagree about the pricing. If you paid $10 for an item, not many people will pay $4 for a $10 item unless it is new in the box and even then some won’t-me being one of them. I can get new things on clearance for 60-90%, so I am not likely to pay 40% of retail at a yard sale. So my suggestion on pricing is 90% or more off retail for clothing and household items. 80% if they are unused with the tags or box. Note I did not say NEW. Furniture should be priced according to condition, if you paid $1000, and have used it for 5 years but it still looks new, you can start it out at $400, but be willing to take less. But if it is 3 yrs old and it looks used, then you aren’t going to get $400, be realistic and start it at $200-250 or even less.

    If you are selling clothes and have a per bag price, instead of saying “fill a bag for $5″ say “Each piece is $xx, but you can fill a whole bag for only $5.” If you are not pricing each item individually, make sure you give a bundle price, “books 50 cents.” “clothing, 50 cents each piece,” etc.. Hang any item you want more than a dollar for.

    I rarely price anything at my sale, and most people don’t have any problems asking for a price. Listen when the seller tells someone else a price to gauge the prices at a sale. Make sure the items you are selling are fairly clean, dust on knick knacks is okay, but clothes should be clean, and nothing should be sticky. It is always a good idea to wipe stuff down before sitting it out.

    Start sitting your stuff out early. If your sign says the sale starts at 8am, you should be outside setting up at 6:30am and every item should be out at least 20 minutes before start time. Expect early birds and also expect that these people are dealers/resellers. Advertise on Craigslist and other free local websites. If you have a lot of clothing, occasionally go straighten them up so they look nice again. The last hour of your sale, do a sweep of your sale and pull back anything you do not want to just give away, and price everything for 25 cents per item. This is a great way to pick up an extra $20-50 at the end. Put out a couple signs just for this, that says “EVERYTHING 25 cents per ITEM” and tell people when they walk up. You won’t believe how many items will sell for a quarter. I personally have sold even nice furniture for a quarter because I didn’t want to carry it back in. Make sure you do the sweep first because you don’t want to sell a valuable collectible for a quarter.

  15. Tracy Kortuem says:

    We are having a yard sale this weekend, and we never price anything. We just let the customer offer a price, and then the negotiations begin.

  16. alg11 says:

    I have had a yard sale every year the past 5 years. Even when you think you have nothing to sell, you can always find things to make a yard sale worth your wild. Tips: Dollar Tree sells stickes with preprinted dollar denominates on them. 300 for a $1, worth the investment; stage your things ie: have a dinning room table and dishes you really want to sell – set the table! More appealing from the curb than boxes… Also, put everything out on a table, if not then get as many eye-catching items on as possible. Clothes: Label and Hang them on wire hangers – go much faster and less frustrating for customers!

    • Maxine says:

      I agree. For me its all about presentation and its just a yard sale. LOL

    • Babyzach2006 says:

      The “staging” comment is SO true! We had a garage sale in June 2010 and were trying to sell a bunch of my in-laws Xmas decorations. NOT going well. Then I got my husband to hook up a long extension cord with a multi-outlet so I could plug things in. Wouldn’t you know it – we started selling Xmas stuff like MAD! Even the 5′ tall moving Santa! (THANK GOODNESS THAT WENT!)

  17. Dixiegirlinafrica05 says:

    price your clothing!! I hate constantly asking “how much are your clothes?” and getting a lousy answer like “well which ones?” “they’re all different prices…”

  18. Dixiegirlinafrica05 says:

    price your clothing!! I hate constantly asking “how much are your clothes?” and getting a lousy answer like “well which ones?” “they’re all different prices…”

  19. I just made $400 selling baby items at my sale. The big items crib, stroller, swing all went to the first person at my sale along with a ton of baby clothes. I still have a lot of stuff left but I am going to hold off on the next sale till my kids outgrow the next size clothes.

    my yard sale hint:
    Kids clothes sell best right before school starts so end of July start of Aug. Make sure that you hang your best ones so that people can see them when they drive by. I have found that hanging clothes sell faster than folded but dont hang too many or people get overwellmed. when you sell somthing off the hanger replace it with a floded item

  20. Caysmomma says:

    Last year I had two sales and I made a total of $800! My husband was less then impressed that I made that much…he wanted to know how the kids had that many clothes to sell! LOL! I tell my customers everything is $1 a piece unless otherwise marked. I don’t intermix my “good” clothes with the junk clothes. I put out a separate table and label the clothes “play clothes 25 cents each”.
    As an avid yard sale buyer myself I love to find the deals and clothes pre-matched up into sets. Some of the best finds I have had include a $5 Columbia snow suit that didn’t even look worn once and a separate $5 Columbia jacket that also didn’t look used at all!
    My least favorite “tricks” that a couple of houses in my cul-de-sac subdivision neighborhood do is watch for other sales being posted and then they hold one too…they don’t have to pay for advertising and these people live right at the entrance of our neighborhood so people just assume they hit the sale they were looking for and then leave after they hit their sale…….you need to make signs that catch the buyers eye and leave a huge trail to your house!!! Use balloons, brightly colored signs and make the letters on them large and VERY legible!!!
    Good luck with all your sales (buying and selling)!!!

  21. Priscilla says:

    The last day of our yard sale we did a $5.00 for as much as you can fit in a grocery sack, we had a specific table and boxes of clothes to choose from, but it went very well. People felt like they were getting a deal and liked shoving as much as they could in and in reality most of the stuff was .25 – .50 items, so we still got our money out and were able to get rid of a lot more than we would have…

  22. Jana says:

    And….don’t bring the stuff back into your house! Have it picked up or transport it to a local thrift store or non-profit thrift store.

  23. Jana says:

    And….don’t bring the stuff back into your house! Have it picked up or transport it to a local thrift store or non-profit thrift store.

  24. Betofspatty says:

    We took our stuff to the flea market. We sold all our old movies and cds for a dollar, and they sold out before the market was even open! Fellow sellers bought them up ad marked them up to make a profit.
    We were moving and figured one way or another we were going to pack things up. It costs up $15 to rent one space. There was no yard clean up, no ads. And we packed up the left-overs and donaited them to a church that we knew was having a charity sale.

  25. TJ says:

    I loved this post. We just had a yard sale this past weekend and managed to make enough to pay our ENTIRE rent for the month! The best part is, we don’t really remember what we sold, so obviously they weren’t things we cared too much about! I do think you should have mentioned something about advertising. Putting a post on Craigslist a couple days before and then the night before is a great way for people mapping out their yard sale routes (I do it!). And then of course signage. Think about when YOU garage sale and you see a sign you can’t read until you have passed it. Those are the most frustrating! We did bright green signs and orange arrows on the 3 busy streets around our house. We didn’t have a lot of big ticket items but did organize it all well and advertised well! It’s amazing how much we made. I highly encourage anyone to try it – just use this post as a guide!

    Oh and we did both ways with our clothes! I DO think people think stuff on racks costs more, so we put the items that DID cost more on the rack (New Carhartt jacket, North Face jackets.. ) and priced EVERYTHING!

  26. Bhc198479 says:

    Neon colored poster board for signs work amazing. Put these up near and around your house to attract customers. The signs are easy to see from the car. Towards the en if the day I lower prices even more! For example I will say all the clothes you can fit in a bag for $3-5. Great way to make money when the customers are not coming at the end of the sale!

    • FancyTX says:

      AH! I forgot signs! I hate trying to read stupid cardboard garage sale signs hunting for the address. All you need is neon and a black arrow at EVERY turn!

      • Sherry says:

        Amen. If I can’t FIND your house, I can’t shop your garage sale. People need to stop putting HUGE “garage sale” with itty bitty address writing on signs that are meant to be read at a glance.

      • alg11 says:

        Dollar General also sells red and white Garage Sale signs that you can reuse… great investment.

    • Babyzach2006 says:

      Signage for yard sales is one of my BIGGEST pet peaves!! I will not get out of my car at a busy intersection to try to read your address. I will not come to your garage sale if your sale sign is dirty and poorly written. My feeling is that if you cannot place a clean, well written sign up to advertise for your sale, then the stuff at your sale is probably not taken care or clean either!

      • bargainshopper says:

        I have a yard sale every year and do very well… I have people asking me when I will have another one, cause I have good stuff !!???? (most of it is junk!) Anyway… I use very large neon signs and in 8″ letters write HUGE YARD SALE… and where it is and date and time… at the bottom I will list things that I have… those signs are at the main intersections in town, at the corners of the road, I just write YARD SALE and the date and time and an arrow…the more signs the more customers….I make at least $300 each YS… and I sell out of my stockpile of toiletries… these always go first…I never overprice, but a lot of people will haggle (that is why people ys I think??) We have a huge Hispanic population and they have always been polite…

  27. Bhc198479 says:

    Neon colored poster board for signs work amazing. Put these up near and around your house to attract customers. The signs are easy to see from the car. Towards the en if the day I lower prices even more! For example I will say all the clothes you can fit in a bag for $3-5. Great way to make money when the customers are not coming at the end of the sale!

  28. Katrethi says:

    Normally I say everything is 25 Cents. I had a hard sale today and when I said every thing was 25 Cents they were more inclined to buy more stuff. I made 36 $ selling clothes shoes and random house decor stuff

  29. Katrethi says:

    Normally I say everything is 25 Cents. I had a hard sale today and when I said every thing was 25 Cents they were more inclined to buy more stuff. I made 36 $ selling clothes shoes and random house decor stuff

  30. FancyTX says:

    As an avid yard sell buyer and host I will tell you cleanliness counts! I hate going to a garage sale where I feel I need a hazmat wash down after handling their items.

    Put like with like! Boxes and tubs are great for this, one box for men’s bottoms, women’s tops, children’s clothing by size etc and give each box a price not each item. Hanging items are perceived as more expensive and as such are rarely looked at.

    And price your stuff! I hate when I have to ask a million times how much something is, I’m more likely to move on than I am to make an offer.

  31. FancyTX says:

    As an avid yard sell buyer and host I will tell you cleanliness counts! I hate going to a garage sale where I feel I need a hazmat wash down after handling their items.

    Put like with like! Boxes and tubs are great for this, one box for men’s bottoms, women’s tops, children’s clothing by size etc and give each box a price not each item. Hanging items are perceived as more expensive and as such are rarely looked at.

    And price your stuff! I hate when I have to ask a million times how much something is, I’m more likely to move on than I am to make an offer.

    • Jen says:

      I totally agree – have everything priced! People hate to ask how much somethng is. I’ve had a different experience with clothing, though.

      We hang all of our clothing and organize by size/type to make it feel like a store. We have found that our clothing sells better and for more $$ by making it look nice on the rack. Several people can browse a rounder at once (I got one free at a clothing store that was going out of business.) rather than crowding and digging through a bin. Clothing is my biggest money maker each year, while my friends say that they have a hard time selling their clothing. They price things for .25-.50 and I price from $1-2. I think hanging them on racks makes all the difference. If you make your stuff look like junk, people will want junk prices. Make it look nice and they’ll perceive that they’re getting something better for their money. Just my 2 cents. :)

      • FancyTX says:

        I usually put all of my children’s clothing in a large plastic pool and mark it everything .50¢, there’s plenty of room around it. My containers are always neatly organized and well labeled with plenty of room up and down the drive way. I usually have a small hanging section for dresses or costumes and it’s rarely even looked at much less purchased from but I can sell the items on CL afterwards for more than I had them marked at the garage sale *headscratch* We have a large hispanic population around here and they wouldn’t pay $1 at Walmart much less a garage sale.

        I made over $400 at my last garage sale and my biggest big ticket item was $30 on a baby bouncer!

        • Butterhead16 says:

          “We have a large hispanic population around here and they wouldn’t pay $1 at Walmart much less a garage sale.” I’m white and still hardly pay $1 at Walmart for clothes! You made a very racist statement here!

        • Butterhead16 says:

          “We have a large hispanic population around here and they wouldn’t pay $1 at Walmart much less a garage sale.” I’m white and still hardly pay $1 at Walmart for clothes! You made a very racist statement here!

          • Marie98croom says:

            Thank you Butterhead16. I totally agree with you! Offended!!

            • Star says:

              “We have a large hispanic population around here and they wouldn’t pay $1 at Walmart much less a garage sale.” That really was not needed.

            • FancyTX says:

              I’m sorry if the TRUTH offends. But 98% of the people who come to my garage sales are Hispanic. I live in south Texas and I have been haggled to DEATH by Hispanics over .10. I’ve never had the same experience with African American’s or whites. Truth is truth, get your feelings off your sleeve.

            • Danamarie04 says:

              I think that’s a little unnecessary to call out a certain race. There is a large population of Hispanics in my town and I actually find them to be the ones who will pay a little more and shell out the cash faster than others! I’VE been haggled to death by “whites” just as much, probably more, than any other race. (And this comes from a fellow “white” person) Get off your high horse! If you have an issue with the kind of people who come to your yard sale then don’t have one at all!

          • Marie98croom says:

            Thank you Butterhead16. I totally agree with you! Offended!!

        • MAgiaunika7 says:

          I’m a hispanic USA citizen and found your comment really offensive, I think we are all in agreement that we like to save money whenever we can, but labeling people like that is just wrong. It’s sad to know that there are still people who are racists and dont mind their words. Shame on you

        • YS Queen of Central Florida says:

          No comment on the actual statement because I am not going there, but I have found that here in Central Florida where the population is at least 30% hispanic that they do not haggle at all, they either buy it or don’t for the most part. The Haitians and Jamaiicans are the worst. I hate to see them coming, I hate going to a yard sale when they are there. I understand they have to ship the items to Haiti or Jamaica, but seriously, if someone comes out with a price of $2, you don’t drop down to 10 cents. Just so everyone knows, I am not prejudiced against them, I just have had a lot of experience with them. They will go through every piece of clothing and pick out the nice stuff and only want to pay 10-25 cents per item. They don’t look at brands too much, just the quality of the item. They will always buy a lot if you will let it go for their rock bottom prices. It is just according to what time of the day it is as to whether I agree or not. If I don’t, I will tell them them what time I will drop everything to a quarter or what time I am closing. I always give everything away, I just sit it all at the end of the curb and list it on freecycle. I have only once had to actually throw anything away and that was because some things were broke while people went through it.

        • YS Queen of Central Florida says:

          No comment on the actual statement because I am not going there, but I have found that here in Central Florida where the population is at least 30% hispanic that they do not haggle at all, they either buy it or don’t for the most part. The Haitians and Jamaiicans are the worst. I hate to see them coming, I hate going to a yard sale when they are there. I understand they have to ship the items to Haiti or Jamaica, but seriously, if someone comes out with a price of $2, you don’t drop down to 10 cents. Just so everyone knows, I am not prejudiced against them, I just have had a lot of experience with them. They will go through every piece of clothing and pick out the nice stuff and only want to pay 10-25 cents per item. They don’t look at brands too much, just the quality of the item. They will always buy a lot if you will let it go for their rock bottom prices. It is just according to what time of the day it is as to whether I agree or not. If I don’t, I will tell them them what time I will drop everything to a quarter or what time I am closing. I always give everything away, I just sit it all at the end of the curb and list it on freecycle. I have only once had to actually throw anything away and that was because some things were broke while people went through it.

  32. FancyTX says:

    As an avid yard sell buyer and host I will tell you cleanliness counts! I hate going to a garage sale where I feel I need a hazmat wash down after handling their items.

    Put like with like! Boxes and tubs are great for this, one box for men’s bottoms, women’s tops, children’s clothing by size etc and give each box a price not each item. Hanging items are perceived as more expensive and as such are rarely looked at.

    And price your stuff! I hate when I have to ask a million times how much something is, I’m more likely to move on than I am to make an offer.

  33. Christina Bryant says:

    This was posted at the perfect time for me. I am having a yard sale this weekend. I will try to use some of this information to have the best sale possible. Thanks!