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Does the idea of cleaning every inch of your home give you happy thoughts? If so, you’re going to love these deep cleaning house tips that will help you get the job done in cost-effective new ways. Expect to use some oldie but goodie favorites like baking soda and vinegar, but we’ve got new cleaning tips using soda and Kool-Aid.

What is deep cleaning, you ask? It’s just giving some extra love to those areas of your house (and car) that you frequent the most. We’ll cover some of the best tips and cleaning hacks to get your space shining again. And you don’t need to wait until spring to start.

As long as you’re planning what to freshen up, why not save some money and stock up on cheap cleaning supplies. Check out The Krazy Coupon Lady’s cleaning supply coupons page for details.

And, to make your life easier, print this free deep cleaning checklist!

 

Deep Cleaning House Tips for Your Kitchen

 

Make an oven sparkle again using baking soda and vinegar.

someone pressing button on oven to preheat

When it’s time to tackle your oven, work smarter not harder. You probably won’t find baking soda and vinegar in your “how to clean a self-cleaning oven” manual. There are actually quite a lot of oven cleaning hacks that involve chemical sprays, but why not use what you already have around your house to get the job done.

Here are the steps:

  1. Remove the oven racks and use a spatula (or rubber gloves) to scrape up and discard any loose food or burnt bits.
  2. Liberally sprinkle baking soda onto the base of the oven; pour vinegar on top until it bubbles.
  3. Let sit for 15 minutes (or longer depending on the level of grime) before scrubbing the sides and base with a scrub brush.
  4. Wipe everything down with a wet towel until clean.

But wait — there are other oven cleaning tips, including one with a lemon!

  1. In a bowl, mix equal parts baking soda, dish soap, and vinegar until it forms a loose paste.
  2. Use rubber gloves to manually apply to the dirty oven, adding more water as needed for coating.
  3. Spray down with plain vinegar (the best vinegar for cleaning is white distilled), and wipe with a damp sponge for a final shine.
  4. For a final (but optional) step, slice a couple of lemons in half and place them on a baking sheet. Pour enough water over them to coat the bottom of the pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 60 minutes.

 

Wax or apply oil to your stove top for easy cleanup.

A glass cooktop stove being polished with Car Wax

Polish your stovetop with car wax, then wipe it off with paper towels or an old sock. Any future spills—no matter how crusty—will wipe off in a jiffy.

If you don’t get to the spill right away, add a few drops of mineral oil on a paper towel and wipe over the hood of your stove or other oily kitchen surfaces.

 

Soak range hood filters with baking soda and Dawn dish soap.

someone scrubbing range hood filter

Its entire job is to collect grease, so it’s no wonder range hoods get disgusting. After you realize how simple the process is, you’ll definitely want to add this to your biannual deep cleaning house checklist.

Carefully remove the hood and soak it in hot, soapy water with baking soda and Dawn dish soap. Let it soak for about 30 minutes, then scrub with a dish brush. Rinse, let dry, then reattach.

 

Improve the look and smell of kitchen sinks with…you guessed it…baking soda and vinegar.

someone holding vinegar and baking soda and mix going down a drain

Pour a cup of baking soda down your drain, then follow with two cups of vinegar. Let sit for at least 30 minutes, then rinse with boiling water. Do this at least once a week to keep everything smelling fresh. Boom — kitchen deep cleaning just got easy!

Looking for Arm & Hammer baking soda coupons to tackle this job? Stop by the KCL coupon page.

 

Use a toothbrush to deep clean a water and ice dispenser.

someone scrubbing refrigerator dispenser pedals with toothbrush

Annelise Woodward

Your refrigerator water and ice dispenser nozzles can hold on to the tiniest of germs. Surely, you don’t want to drink (or smell) funky ice cubes or water.

For this task, create a 50/50 solution of vinegar and water, and use an old toothbrush to get into the crevices of your fridge’s water dispenser. Clean monthly!

Related: Household Cleaning Tips

 

Freeze lemon slices and vinegar to freshen garbage disposals.

A person putting a vinigar ice cute with a lemon wedge in it, down a garbage disposal.

Cut lemons into small pieces and add them to a white vinegar-filled ice cube tray. Freeze until solid and place into Ziploc bags for easy retrieval. When your sink starts to smell, add 1-2 ice cubes to your running garbage disposal until the crushing sound has stopped. Lemon extract can be used in a pinch.

 

Dawn dish soap and warm water will help remove grease from kitchen cabinets.

A person cleaning cupboards with dawn dish soap.

Mix 2 tablespoons of Dawn dish soap with 2 cups of warm water. Following the grain of the wood, scrub the cabinet with a clean cloth. With a clean sponge and warm water, wipe away any remaining soap, and dry with a clean towel.

 

 

Wipe high-touch areas with antibacterial wipes to make kitchen deep cleaning easier.

someone cleaning cabinet handles with a wipe

When it comes to kitchen deep cleaning, there are lots of touch surfaces that are probably not cleaned frequently enough. The handles and drawer pulls on your cabinets and the buttons on your microwave are breeding grounds for germs and should be disinfected regularly. Use an antibacterial spray or wipe to keep the germs at bay at least once a day — especially during the dreaded cold and flu season.

 

Deep Cleaning House Tips for Your Floors

 

Spray Resolve to remove grout from tile floors.

someone using Resolve carpet cleaner to clean the grout between tiles.

You’ve probably used Resolve as a deep carpet cleaning solution, but did you know that it can also be used on your floor’s dirty grout? Spray some of the Resolve carpet foam into the grout lines, use a scrub brush to lift the debris, and let it sit for about 10 minutes before wiping off. Then, just mop floors as usual.

Sprinkle baking soda to deep clean window tracks.

someone pouring baking soda in the track of a sliding door with a bottle of vinegar next to it

To disinfect your window tracks, sprinkle baking soda throughout, more heavily if you have a buildup of gunk. Spray vinegar over it, and let it sit for at least 5 minutes. Wipe with a damp cloth.

 

Wrap a microfiber cloth to a broom to deep clean baseboards.

someone using a rubber band to secure a microfiber cloth over a broom.

There are all sorts of baseboard cleaning hacks, but most of them require you to kneel for long periods of time. As part of your home deep cleaning project, you can tackle it without having to be on your hands and knees!

Attach a microfiber cloth to a broom with twine or a large rubber band. Dampen the cloth with warm soapy water, and drag it along your baseboards.

 

Or, remove dust from baseboards with a dryer sheet.

Person cleaning baseboards with dryer sheets

Simply swipe a dryer sheet along your dirty baseboards when they’re starting to build up dust. Dry sheets help prevent such build up, so this is an easy fix. Use Gain or Bounce coupons the next time you need to stock up.

 

Destroy bacteria on hardwood floors with black tea.

someone putting tea bag in bucket of water and mopping floors with the water from the bucket.

Here’s the tea on deep cleaning (and shining) your hardwood floors — use actual tea bags. The compounds in black tea can inhibit microbial growth. This tip is most useful on medium-colored hardwood floors; lighter colored floors would need half of the number of tea bags.

Boil 7-8 black tea bags in 1/2 gallon of water, and steep for 10-15 minutes. Let cool. Fill your mop bucket up with the hot black tea, and use a rag to test a small area for any discoloration. Continue to mop as usual if no discoloration appears.

 

Make a DIY cleaning solution to freshen carpet.

someone spraying carpet and using rag to scrub the carpet

Most carpet cleaning tips involve expensive and strongly scented name-brand products, but you can make your own. Mix equal parts dish soap, warm water, baking soda, and white vinegar in a spray bottle. Spray the stain and let it sit for 30 minutes, then blot with a damp sponge or scrub brush. Vacuum to remove any remaining liquid.

 

Or, get rid of stubborn carpet stains with an iron and vinegar.

An iron next to a bottle of white vinegar and a white towel.

No need to buy pricey carpet stain removers—just spray the stain with 1 part vinegar and 2 parts water, lay a damp towel over the spot, and iron on the steam setting for 30 seconds. You may need to repeat the steps if the stain is really stubborn.

 

Use a rubber glove or squeegee as a pet hair magnet.

someone using a squeegee to clean pet hair off carpet

You’d be surprised at what rubber attracts! Use a squeegee or wear rubber dish-washing gloves, and run your hand over carpet covered in pet hair.

 

Deep Cleaning House Tips for Your Bathroom

 

Make a baking soda paste to remove dirt from bathroom tiles.

someone scrubbing tile with baking soda

To make your bathtub grout sparkle again, make a paste with baking soda and warm water, and apply it to your grout. Soak a microfiber cloth in warm water and a few drops of mild soap then wipe off the baking soda mixture.

 

 

Clean a bathtub with a soap-dispensing sponge.

someone scrubbing bathtub with soap and baking soda

As long as you’re in the bathroom cleaning your grout, here are a few more cleaning tips to make your bathroom look and smell fresh. Fill a soap-dispensing sponge with Dawn dish soap, warm water, and baking soda.

Adding a few drops of your favorite essential oil in the sponge can really transform your bathroom experience for days to come. Next, scour your wet bathtub until the dirt is removed and rinse with fresh water.

 

Or, scrub the tub with half a grapefruit dipped in salt.

someone dipping half a grapefruit into a bowl of salt and using it to scrub a tub

If you don’t have a special scrub handy, make your own. Salt creates an abrasive texture while the citric acid in the grapefruit will help break down stains. Lemons work well, too!

 

Get rid of all the dust in your bathroom’s exhaust fan with compressed air.

someone using a can of compressed air to clean the air vents

Those spray cans of “air” aren’t just for computer keyboards. Compressed air dusters can dislodge the months (or years) old dust hanging out in your bathroom’s exhaust fan. Just spray it, watch it fall, and sweep it up.

 

Try these cleaning methods to remove hard water stains from a showerhead.

Someone putting a shower head into a bucked with a bottle of vinegar

Either remove your showerhead or create a vinegar shower cap by filling a quart-size plastic bag (or larger depending on the size of the showerhead) with equal parts vinegar and water. Submerge the showerhead in the bag and secure it with a rubber band. Soak for 15-20 minutes, depending on the level of hard water stains and mineral deposits. Rinse well.

In addition to the vinegar method, you can try these other deep cleaning solutions:

  • Apply baking soda to an old toothbrush or sponge, add water, and scrub the showerhead until the stains are gone.
  • Scrub the showerhead with equal amounts of dish soap and vinegar.

 

Deep clean a toilet with a disinfecting wipe and screwdriver.

someone using a screwdriver and wipe to clean toilet

No matter how many toilet cleaning hacks there are, it’s probably still not a job that you’ll want to volunteer for. At least this deep cleaning tip provides some distance between you and the stains.

Put a disinfectant wipe on the tip of a flathead screwdriver, then push it between the edge of the toilet seat and the base of your toilet tank. You’ll get rid of so many germs and built-up grime.

 

Pour a pack of lemon or orange Kool-Aid to scrub away stains in the toilet.

someone pouring a packet of yellow Kool Aid into a toilet and scrubbing it with a brush

Pour a packet of orange flavored or lemon Kool-Aid into your toilet bowl and scrub away the stains with a toilet brush. The citric acid and the abrasive texture of the powder help break down and dissolve stains. Plus, citrus Kool-Aid smells a whole lot better than chemical cleaning solutions.

 

Remove stubborn toilet stains with soda.

someone pouring a Coca Cola into a toilet

Instead of pouring cola (fizzy or flat) down the drain, pour it around the rim of your toilet bowl and let it sit for an hour. The corrosive acids in the cola will break down the stains.

 

Spray a vodka and water solution to remove mold and mildew in a shower or kitchen.

someone pouring vodka into spray bottle and spraying tile

If you happen to have extra vodka lying around, mix it with an equal amount of water in a spray bottle. Now you can tackle grease, soap scum, or mildew in your shower, kitchen sink, mirrors, cutting boards, or linens (mix it with an essential oil).

You’ll want to use a vodka with a high alcohol content so the degreaser and disinfectant properties actually work. For a shower cleaning hack, vodka is pretty effective in a pinch. It’s also a great alternative for individuals who are sensitive to the smell of harsh chemicals.

 

Get rid of soap scum on shower doors and sinks with cooking spray.

someone spraying cooking spray onto a shower door and wiping it

Spray the inside of glass shower doors with nonstick spray and watch the scum and hard water residue disappear. Wait 5 – 10 minutes and go over the door with a clean, absorbent cloth to remove the residue.

 

Then, prevent future water stains with auto glass water repellent (like Rain-X).

Someone using Rain-X on a shower door

Rain-X repels rain, so this tip makes for a clever deep cleaning trick to remove soap scum and finish your cleaning with a spot-free shine. Spray liberally and wipe with a soft cloth.

 

Deep Cleaning Tips for (and Using) a Washing Machine and Dryer

 

Combine vinegar and water to deep clean washing machines.

someone using a rag to clean washing machine

You could buy one of those expensive washing machine cleaning kits, or you could use a couple of household items to get the job done and save money. Be sure to check your manufacturer’s instructions on cleaning the machine, as vinegar may damage the rubber parts if used too frequently.

Rinse your washer with a 50/50 mixture of vinegar and water regularly. It will help get rid of that mildewy smell that can build up in there. For periodic deep cleaning, you can fill a spray bottle with the same mixture for a quick wiping down.

 

 

Or, use citrus Kool-Aid to remove rust, gunk, and buildup inside a washing machine.

someone pouring KoolAid into a washing machine

The citric acid in lemon or orange Kool-Aid helps break down the buildup in your washing machine. Run 1/4 cup lemon or orange Kool-Aid in a regular wash cycle—without clothes—and repeat as needed.

 

Clean your shower curtain liner in the washing machine.

Somene putting a dirty shower curtain liner into a washing machine and removing a clean one.

When your fabric, vinyl, or cotton shower curtain has seen better days, it’s time to revive it. Throw in some regular detergent or baking soda — along with a few towels with the liner — to help scrub away the toughest stains.

 

Repurpose an old pillowcase and a paint stirring stick to deep clean your dryer’s lint trap.

A person using a paint stirring stick and a pillowcase to clean out a dryer's link trap

I’m pretty sure your dryer’s lint trap is often overlooked. With a paint stirring stick (or a ruler) and a pillowcase, fish out the stuck lint for good. Set a goal to do this monthly.

 

Deep Cleaning Tips for Your Car

 

Clean dirty cup holders with an old sock.

someone using an old sock, Windex, and a travel cup to clean cup holders in their car.

Put an old sock over the bottom of a travel cup, spray it with Windex, and twist in the cup holders to remove dirt and grime. You’ll be surprised — and grossed out — by all of the junk that appears. For best results, plan a car deep cleaning project every few months.

someone putting a cup with a sock on it in a cup holder

 

 

Use foam craft brushes for deep cleaning your car vents.

Someone dusting an auto A/C vent with a foam craft brush.

For part two of car deep cleaning tips, you’ll need a foam craft brush. Car air conditioning vents can form mold and trap dust, but vinegar is an excellent disinfectant. Mix equal parts of warm water and vinegar, dip your brush (removing excess), and clean each vent individually. You could even add lemon juice or an essential oil to the mixture to freshen your vents.

Plan to do this twice a month to remove excess dust from polluting you and your guests.

 

Deep Cleaning Tips for (and Using) Your Dishwasher

 

Run a dishwasher cycle with vinegar to remove grime.

someone pouring vinegar in a measuring cup in dishwasher

Deep clean the dishwasher by placing a measuring cup filled with 2 cups of vinegar in the top rack. Just as vinegar can clean and descale a coffee maker, it can also remove grime from your dishwasher when you run a normal cycle with two cups of vinegar. Don’t use detergent or heat dry when you do this.

 

 

Place vent covers in your dishwasher.

someone putting their air conditioning vent covers in the dishwasher.

Using the machine’s power washing and sanitizing features can do wonders for air conditioning vents. Close the vents before adding them to the dishwasher so there’s more surface area that gets cleaned. Then, blow dry any remaining water from the covers on the cool setting before installing covers back over your vents.

If you don’t have a dishwasher, you could soak the vents in a large container of hot, soapy water and rinse until clear. Air dry thoroughly before re-installing. When you make your spring cleaning tips list, add this idea when tackling your central heat vents.

 

Disinfect toys, flip-flops, and brushes in your dishwasher.

A woman placing kids toys in a dish washer to clean them.

The next time you need to wash and disinfect large quantities of household items, throw them in the dishwasher. Here’s some examples:

  • kid and pet toys
  • dish sponges
  • rubber footwear
  • brushes and combs (yes, the kind for hair)
  • stove burners
  • vent covers
  • cup and fixture covers
  • small tools
  • scissors
  • pulls and knobs
  • outlet shields

Put the smallest items in those mesh laundry bags before you wash.

Clean the dishwasher trap with a toothbrush.

Someone scrubbing a dishwasher trap with an old toothbrush

Under the lower sprayer, you’ll find a piece that’s removable. In it, you may see bits of food and other buildup (you’d be surprised what doesn’t go completely down the drain!). Use a toothbrush to remove buildup, then rinse the rest off in the sink.

 

Add lemon Kool-Aid to help sanitize your dishwasher.

Someone adding lemon Kool Aid to the dischwasher

Again with the Kool-Aid hack. Fill your empty dishwasher’s detergent compartment with lemon Kool-Aid and run a normal cycle. The citric acid will help remove buildup and sanitize it.

 

Deep Cleaning Tips for Your Broom

 

Suck up leftover dirt on a broom with a vacuum.

someone vacuuming a broom.

Vacuuming your broom may seem like an odd deep cleaning house task, but just imagine how much your broom has to put up with – dust, food, hair, miscellaneous toys, and germs.

This may not be a weekly requirement, but a good vacuuming can restore it back to life.You’ll want to manually remove any obvious balls of hair or dust before using your vacuum’s upholstery attachment to clean in between the bristles.

 

Soak brooms in soapy water as another deep clean method.

broom in a bucket of warm water and dish soap.

Add a few drops of dish soap in a bucket of warm water, and soak your broom for an hour. Rinse and let it dry completely before storing it away. And don’t forget the dustpan! Spray it with disinfectant, or use a bleach wipe.

 

Deep Cleaning Tips For Furniture, Appliances, Fixtures, and Lighting

 

Make use of a Q-tip to deep clean light switch plates.

someone cleaning light switches and plates with rubbing alcohol.

Light switches are truly the unsung heroes of the house. They take on food stains and germs like a pro, but they’re about to get a deep cleaning facelift courtesy of rubbing alcohol.

Spray a cleaning cloth with regular household cleaner or rubbing alcohol, and wipe the surface of your light switches (don’t apply cleaning solution directly on the switch!). Get into the crevices with a Q-tip.

 

Remove excess dirt off lampshades with a lint roller.

A person using a lint roller to clean a lampshade

Lint rollers are pretty cool cleaning hacks for clothes, but for lamps — who knew? You’ll want to use the roller on fabric lampshades to be able to thoroughly collect the dust in crevices. Given the simplicity, this could be a great introductory weekly chore for small kids.

 

Dust blinds with an old sock.

Someone using an old sock to clean and dust blinds.

Ditch those fancy magnetic dusters and just use a cotton sock to wipe off blinds. Have a few handy in case your blinds have a lot of built-up junk.

 

Shine chrome faucets with wax paper.

someone using wax paper to shine a faucet

I bet you didn’t know that you had a secret cleaning weapon in your wax paper. It’s the perfect wipe for removing fingerprints, smudges, and water spots. Try it on your bathroom, bar, or kitchen faucets.

 

Dust ceiling fan blades with an old pillowcase.

someone using a pillowcase to dust a ceiling fan blade

Find a soft pillowcase that will attract dust easily—flannel or cotton both work great. Starting from the innermost part of the blade, with one hand on the top of the pillowcase, steadily dust off the fan blade. All the dust will fall into the pillowcase instead of on your head or onto the floor.

Add soap and water to a dirty blender and blend it clean.

soap and water added to a dirty blender and blend it clean.

When I first saw my mom blending soap and water in her blender, I was pretty sure she was finally losing it. Then she explained that a quick rinse to make sure there’s no dried gunk, plus one blend cycle leaves you ready for another round.

 

Rub olive oil on your couch to make it shine again.

someone wiping couch with rag next to olive oil

Rub olive oil on a rag to improve any scratched-up spots on your leather furniture. Let sit for about an hour, then wipe down with a damp cloth. Your leather will be clean and shiny again.

If you need a coupon for olive oil, download or print one out from the KCL coupon page.

 

Vacuum the underside of your furniture twice a year.

someone vacuuming chair legs

Ideally, deep cleaning the underside of your furniture should occur every six months. No, not underneath your furniture (though you should be doing that, too) but the underside. Dust, mites, and spider eggs all collect in those cool, dark spaces. Make sure to use the hose attachment of your vacuum to clean the bottoms of your furniture at least twice a year.

 

Deep Cleaning Tips for the Bedroom

Break out the vacuum again to deep clean your mattress.

A person pulling back the sheets and mattress pad from a mattress

Mattresses can harbor dead skin cells, pet hair, dust mites, bacteria, and allergens. After you toss your sheets in the wash, start by vacuuming your mattress with the upholstery tool. Liberally (and evenly) sprinkle baking soda and let sit for several hours before vacuuming again. You can then spray an essential oil to make it smell fresh again.

 

Remove dirt from walls with soapy water.

someone wiping wall with rag

Sure, you wash your clothes, but what about your closet? Remove everything from your closet, wipe down the walls with a mixture of mild soap, water, and essential oil. Be sure not to forget the clothes rod!

50 Deep Cleaning House Hacks for Neat Freaks