It's true. I get paid to tell companies what I like and don't like about their client's website. I freely share when I'm frustrated because I can't find something, or when the site is just too cluttered. The website testing company passes this information along to their client so the client can optimize their site for a better user experience. And I get paid.

THE AUDITION:  You must complete a quick 1-15 minute audition where you complete tasks (e.g., find and click on "the map" on this website) as if it were a real website test for a real client. Once the audition is over, the company sends you an email informing you whether or not you qualify to test websites. (I've never not qualified when I've auditioned.) After that, you receive email invitations to take tests.

The best part is you don't need any experience. You just need high-speed Internet, a computer with a microphone (most are internal), and maybe a webcam. Oh, and the ability to share your thoughts out loud. If I can do it, you can do it.

While you can't quit your day job, you can earn up to $100-$200 per month when you sign up to test for multiple companies.

I scoured the web to find the most popular testing websites, and then I tried them out. Here's what I found:

 

1. Earn $10 per test with UserTesting.👍

UserTesting pays $10 per 20-30 minute test. Unlike other sites, they also offer shorter tests at a $3 per 5 minute test rate. You'll need to download UserTesting's software and audition to begin.

The Good:

Audition was straightforward. Nothing was confusing, and after I finished the audition, I had a chance to give written feedback about the client's website. It was nice to have another chance to summarize the frustrations I had on the client's site and what improvements I'd recommend.

Immediately receive testing opportunities once you pass the audition. I received emails with 6 opportunities to test websites right away!

Real feedback on your first test. I got a score of 4 out of 5 on my first test, with feedback encouraging me to speak my thoughts even more in order to serve the client better and get myself a higher rating. A higher rating results in more opportunities to take tests and earn money.

The Bad:

Audition was more involved. While the audition wasn't confusing, it took longer to complete because there were more tasks to do.

A lot of waiting around. It's like "hurry up and wait." Although I received 6 tests right away, I was told I had to wait for a human to review my first test before I could get more testing opportunities. So it took four days to get my audition approved. And then after my first test, I had to wait a couple more days.

 

2. Earn $10 per test with TryMyUI.👍

TryMyUI pays $10 per 15-20 minute test. You need to download their software and then audition to qualify.

The Good:

No time limit on audition. I didn't feel rushed at all, which allowed me to relax and think clearly.

Quick audition approval and immediate tests. I immediately received an email that I'd been approved to begin testing, and I got four invites to take tests right away.

Easy task-by-task approach. You complete one task, mark it off the list, and move to the next one. Super easy.

Lots of testing opportunities. I receive an average of about 4-6 emails with opportunities to take tests per day. Considering the biggest objection people have with becoming a tester is that there aren't enough opportunities to take tests—this many opportunities is incredible.

The Bad:

Software setup is a bit more complex. If you don't have any tech knowledge at all, it might be more challenging.

Testing opportunities go fast. If you don't act sooner-than-immediately, you'll miss the chance. I opened an email invitation one minute, and 45 seconds after I received it (I looked at what time it was compared to email time stamp), the test was gone already because someone else got to it first!

3. Earn $10 per test with Userlytics.👍

Userlytics pays $10 per 10-20 minute test. You just need to sign up in order to get started.

The Good:

Doesn't require an audition. It's easy and quick to sign up.

Anyone can test. This website is open to people from all countries.

The Bad:

You might be videoed. Some testing opportunities require a video view of your face while you review the site.

Not a lot of testing opportunities. So far, I haven't received any invitations to take a test. Perhaps because there's no audition required? There may be way more testers than clients.

Pay dependent on performance You only get paid if the client approves and positively rates your test. Feels like a sneaky loophole. I'm not sure I want my pay to depend on the client's opinion this much. After all, I still did the work.

 

 

4. Earn up to $25 per test with Validately.👍

Validately operates a little differently than the other websites. They pay $5 for 5-minute tests or $25 for 25-minute tests. You'll need to audition in order to qualify.

The Good:

Highest pay-per-hour opportunity. You'll earn a dollar per minute!

The Bad:

Long, detailed and intrusive questionnaire. After I auditioned, I had to answer a lot of questions about myself and my children before I could begin testing websites. It felt sort of like a "gotcha," because even though the audition was easy, there was this second set of hoops I had to jump through which other companies didn't require.

Live tests only. This means you have to pick a time of day to do the tests and be around if a test becomes available during the time slot you chose. It feels like a commitment I don't want to make.

Long wait time. After I auditioned and finished the questionnaire, I got an email saying it takes 7 days to review my test and decide if I qualify to begin testing.

 

RELATED: 31 Companies That Send You Products to Test for Free

 

5. I’ve never earned the $10 per test with Analysia.👎

Analysia pays $10 per 10-15 minute test. Just sign up and wait to receive a testing opportunity by email.

The Good:

Doesn't require an audition. Again, this is nice because you're only waiting to be invited to take tests. You're not waiting to find out if you qualify.

The Bad:

Website isn't user friendly. It's difficult to navigate, and it has a more unprofessional feel to it due to a few grammar errors.

No communication. I registered, but there was no confirmation email or anything.

Lack of testing opportunities. It's been a week and a half since I registered, and I still haven’t received a testing invitation.

 

6. I’ve heard you can earn $8 per test with WhatUsersDo. 👎

WhatUsersDo pays the lowest amount, comparatively, at up to $8 per 15-20 minute test. You download the software and take a 5-minute audition test to qualify.

The Good:

Audition was easy. There was only one task to complete. I did it in under 5 minutes.

Quick response. I got an email after my audition saying I'd hear back in a week, but I found out after only two days that I'd qualified.

Invitations to test came right away. Immediately after I qualified, the emails inviting me to test websites came pouring in.

The Bad:

Difficult to pass pre-screening questions. So far I haven't qualified to take any tests with WhatUsersDo. The pre-screening questions tell me I'm not eligible. So while it's nice that there are opportunities, I haven't actually made it through the gates.

 

There are more testers than clients in this industry, and every test you're invited to take is on a first come, first served basis. You really have to move fast! The testing itself is really fun and easy. And when you're the first one to a test and you pass the screening questions, it's really exciting. $10 for about 15 minutes of your time isn't too shabby either.

Have you ever tested websites? What's your favorite site to work with, and where are you making the most money? Share in the comments!

 

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