So you wanna build a stockpile and stop paying full price for groceries, eh? Smart move, friend.

In this post, you’ll learn how to build your own stockpile without blowing your weekly budget.

 

1. Focus on one household necessity per week.

Household items like toothpaste, toilet paper, shampoo, soap, and detergent are some great items to stockpile first because you know you’ll use them, and you can often get them for cheap or free with coupons.

Each week, go through the deals KCL posts, and focus in on one type of household essential. Search by product (like “detergent”) or by brand (like “Tide”) under the Coupons section of the site. Then print the free coupons listed in the deal and head to the store, telling yourself that you’ll only spend a maximum of $10 on this week’s stockpile item.

Next week focus on another household essential. In a couple of months or so, you’ll have a stockpile of products you got for dirt cheap to “shop” from instead of running to the grocery store and paying full price.

Make it a goal to build a six-month supply and replenish stockpile items only as needed, keeping in mind expiration dates.

 

2. Look for the stock-up symbols in KCL deals.

As you browse through deals, keep an eye out for the little stockpile symbols above. When an item is at least 50% off, you’ll see them next to the final price listed in the deals KCL posts.

The symbol with six piled rectangles means the price is so low, you should get enough product to last you at least six months. See the icon with three rectangles? It means the price is still pretty darn good, and you should stock up for a three-month supply.

Download this Free Stock-Up Price Sheet to know when a price is HOT with or without coupons.

 

3. Only coupon for ‘Under $1’ KCL deals.

The easiest, most-convenient way to score deals under a buck is through the Krazy Coupon Lady. Only shop the posted deals where your total with coupons is $1 or less.

The easiest way to do this on the free KCL app (available on Apple and Android phones) is to customize your Favorite Stores list so the deals you see are only for the retailers you frequent the most, saving you time.

On the site, hover over the Deals menu in the top navigation bar to view Deals categories. Select “Under $1” below “Search by Price,” and scroll through to find the household essentials you need.

 

4. Stock up when you see a freebie or moneymaker.

Just like Under $1 Deals, you can narrow your stockpile shopping list by searching “free,” or even better, “moneymaker” on the KCL app or site.

For instance, when you see freebies like this one for shaving cream, stock up and get a six-month supply. KCL scored three free cans of Satin Care shaving cream by using three $0.50/1 coupons on top of a $5 gift card promotion and sale price at Target.

 

RELATED: 7 Easy Tips for Building a Better Stockpile

 

5. Know what’s on sale every month and plan ahead.

Products go on sale in cycles. For instance every January, you’ll find Christmas clearance and some of the lowest prices all year on citrus fruits and cold medicine—among other things. When considering what to stockpile and when, think about sales cycles.

For instance, don’t wait until next flu season to buy medicine; plan ahead and buy it now in January while the price is hot. Same goes for condiments and chips in May and June when Memorial Day and Fourth of July sales start popping up. Stock up then to last you all school year.

Learn more in The Best Time to Buy Everything by Month of Year.

 

 

6. Sign up for email alerts.

Be one of the first to know when a hot deal comes up by signing up for email alerts. KCL will send you the best deals of the day so you never miss a stock-up opportunity again!

Sign up now!

 

7. Print two of the same coupon from each registered phone number.

In order to score stock-up deals on KCL, you’ll often need at least two copies of the same coupon. Don’t try to photocopy a coupon, though. That’s totally not allowed, and be prepared for rejection beeping at the register should you try it. Each coupon has a unique barcode (with the exception of PDF coupons) to help retailers and manufacturers limit and track discounts.

What you’ll wanna do is print one coupon for, say, Planters nuts from Coupons.com, then hit the back button and clip the coupon to print again. On most free coupon sites, you’re allowed to print the same coupon twice from each registered phone number or device. Each print will generate a different barcode. You can then go on your cell, or use a second registered number, and print two more Planters nuts coupons. Not bad, eh? Browse KCL’s free coupon database now.

Learn more in How to Find and Print Free Internet Coupons.

 

8. Sign up and use drugstore rewards programs.

If you’re serious about stockpiling, signing up for the CVS, Walgreens, and Rite Aid rewards programs is a must. Here’s why:

All three major drugstores offer rewards points in exchange for buying certain products, which are advertised weekly in the store ad. Earning rewards points is easy when you use coupons to save, and accumulating points leads to in-store credit that can be used like cash at the register.

For example, recently Luvs ($13.99) and Huggies ($18.99) boxed diapers were on sale at Rite Aid. Because I have a Plenti Points card, I was eligible to receive 2,000 Plenti Points (worth $20 at Rite Aid) for buying at least $50 worth of these promotional products. There was also a $10 Catalina coupon that would print at the register anytime a customer purchased at least $30 worth of Huggies products. So I bought two boxes of Huggies, a box of Luvs, and used a coupon for each box as well as a Checkout 51 rebate. With the Plenti Points credit and Catalina, I only paid $4.66 per box of diapers! (See the deal here.)

Use any rewards points received one week—like the 2,000 Plenti Points above—for the following week’s stockpile purchase, and you’ll rarely have to pay out of pocket when shopping at drugstores.

 

 

Ready to start stockpiling? Check out the hottest savings now.

 

UP NEXT: 17 Couponing Tips That Blew Our Minds in 2016

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How to Build a Stockpile for Less than $10 a Week