A successful interaction with the store manager (no matter where you shop) is extremely important because they’re the ones who are going to give you a better chance of saving a lot of cash. In fact, the manager is someone you should get to know on a first name basis and someone you should develop a good rapport with. They’ll be the person writing your rain checks, performing overrides, checking for additional stock, and either making or breaking your transaction

I like to make eye contact, call the manager by their name, and always thank them for their exceptional service. Here are five tips that will make your conversation with the store manager a success every time!

1. Keep your conversation specific

At the hospital where I work, we have a system that you have to follow when you call a physician. You must have your facts together before you engage the physician’s time. The same goes for the store manager. Their time is valuable and they appreciate a customer who can be concise in communicating their specific need. I like to have my sales flyer available so I can show them the item I’m discussing. I’ve found 90% of my interactions with the store manager to be positive when I set the positive vibe! I also don’t engage in personal commentary, other than hello, unless the store manager initiates it. I need their time focused on what I need help with.

2. Use scripting to initiate the conversation

This is an essential component of customer interaction. Using the same script for specific interactions will make it a habit and guarantee success!

Here are a few of my favorite scripts:

  • Would you mind checking the stockroom for this particular item?
  • Would you look at my receipt and show me where my coupon was credited?
  • Could you tell me why this item rang up at this price?
  • I really appreciate the time you’ve spent helping me!

3. Be courteous with their effort

If you asked the store manager to order 10 cases of paper towels for you, don’t leave the store hanging by not picking up the product. I’m “old school” when it comes to keeping my word. If I say I’ll be there, I will. If you can’t fulfill the terms of an agreement with a store manager, pick up the phone and notify them. They will appreciate not getting stuck with 10 extra cases of a product that they can’t sell for a profit. If you ask the clerk to call the store manager so the stockroom can be checked for an empty shelf item, don’t leave before he/she gets back with the answer. Chances are the next time you ask the store manager to check the storeroom, you’ll get an automatic answer, “I don’t have any in the stockroom either.”

4. Maintain your voice at a normal pitch

A store manager has been trained in people skills and he/she doesn’t want an embarrassing situation any more than you do. One way to keep the conversation on an even playing field is to not raise your voice. Creating a scene makes you one of their least favorite customers! I’ve been in line behind a customer who embarrassed me with their tone when “arguing” about using a coupon or getting an item on sale. I felt so much empathy for the manager who was at the other end of the verbal barrage! Remember, the manager is there to satisfy the customer (so there’s no need to yell at them).

5. Compliment their store and employees

There’s nothing that puts a bigger smile on my face than for someone to compliment my child! It makes me feel like I’ve accomplished something, and the store manager feels the same way about their store and employees. Last week, I completed a survey for Rite Aid and marked a lower score for a certain service. The next time I went in the store, the manager checked me out, gave me another survey, and said that she would appreciate me telling her of any improvements that needed to be made so she could take care of it immediately! Not only is this amazing customer service skills, but it also shows how much she cares about her store and employees—so why not let them know!

 

This is a guest post by Tammy, a nurse, from St. Pauls, North Carolina.

5 Tips for Success with the Store Manager